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Geologic dating principles

geologic dating principles-46

Topics include: Management Basics; Classical School of Management; Behavioral School of Management Theory; Contemporary and Future School of Management Theory; Organizational Change; Organizing in Business Management; Work Teams; Leading in Organizations; Leadership Theory; Motivation in the Workplace; Communication in the Workplace; Financial Management; Human Resources; Strategic Management and Managerial Decision Making; Production and Quality Assurance; International Management and Contemporary Issues.

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Students can save on their education by taking the online, self-paced courses and earn widely transferable college credit recommendations for a fraction of the cost of a traditional course.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: define and compare managerial accounting functions, processes and responsibilities; distinguish between cash management, auditing, and financial reporting methods; understand and define cost classifications and formulas, and calculate cost and profit analyses; evaluate cash flow, income statements, inventory and costing systems; describe the activity-based costing process; identify and distinguish between the components of budgets and standard cost evaluations; examine accounting reporting tools and reporting responsibilities; learn how to calculate, analyze and make decisions regarding costs, investments, budgeting, spending and cash flow; explain how financial statements, income statement, balance sheets and cash flow statements are prepared and used; and interpret and analyze various types of financial statements.Major topics include: overview of managerial accounting; internal controls in accounting; cost types; cost behavior analysis and cost volume profit; job-order costing and process costing; basics of activity-based costing; budgeting and standard costs; reporting systems and structures in accounting; short and long-term decision-making in accounting; and basics of financial statement analysis.Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to: understand the basics of industrial labor and relations in the United States; explore the history and local, state, and national structure of unions and organized labor, including their organization and management strategies; recognize the regulation and deregulation in labor laws in the United States; list the theories and models behind union development and process certification and decertification; identify and describe collective bargaining; explore the concepts of contract administration and labor arbitration from a corporate perspective; and discover the differences in union formation and bargaining around the world.Topics include: The Industrial Relations System; Union Structure, Organization & Management; American Labor History; American Labor Law in the Private Sector Before 1960; American Labor Law in the Private Sector After 1960; The Organizing Process; Collective Bargaining; Contract Administration; Labor Arbitration; The Public Sector; International Labor Relations.Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: appraise the process involved in corporate governance and how it applies to managerial accounting; evaluate the reports that make up the financial statements and how to prepare them; summarize the functions of cost classifications, cost allocation, and job order cost systems; breakdown cost-volume-profit analysis and how it relates to income statements; dissect how firms decide on a pricing strategy and the different pricing methods; summarize how companies set standard costs and why they are advantageous; point out the different methods, ratios and formulas important in financial analysis; evaluate the software programs pertinent to managerial accounting, and discover their benefits; and assess the different types of budgeting, including capital budgeting, why budgeting is important, and different methods for budgeting.

Methods of instruction include audiovisual materials and case studies.

Upon successful completion of the course, students will be able to: compare and convert percentages, fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals; graph and solve 1- and 2- variable linear equations and quadratic functions using a variety of methods; compute slopes, midpoints, and distances using formulas; calculate probabilities for simple and compound events; identify and calculate statistical values such as mean, median, mode, range, and standard deviation; compute depreciation and report it on balance sheets; compare common terms pertaining to credit, interest, and purchases; solve interest, markups, markdowns, annual rates, and other financial equations; distinguish and calculate types of costs, ratios, stocks, and bonds; and demonstrate understanding of gross pay, net pay, taxes, and exchange rates.

Methods of instruction include audiovisual materials. Major topics include number sense; linear equations and inequalities; graphing and evaluating equations and functions; quadratic equations and functions; probability and statistics for business math; depreciation/salvage values; interest and purchases; financial analysis and business math applications.

Interpret financial ratios for companies, efficiency ratios, leverage ratios and issues with financial statement analysis.

Major topics include: introduction to accounting; financial statements; mechanics of the accounting cycle; adjusting accounts and preparing financial statements; internal controls; merchandising operations and inventory; receivables; completing the operating cycle; long-term assets; current and long-term liabilities; reporting and analyzing equity; statement of cash flows; and financial statement analysis and interpretation.

Major topics include: business ownership types; key accounting concepts; journals and ledgers in accounting; accounting equations and formulas; financial statements, balance sheets and income statements; analyzing financial statements; financial statement ratios; accounting for inventory; accounting for deprecation; accounting for compensation, taxes and liabilities; adjustments and closing entries; corporate accounting; departmentalized accounting; taxation for corporations; and business and financial forecasting.